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Man falls into Lake Lanier and disappears, GA officials say


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Georgia Officials have yet to find the man since he fell overboard and didn’t resurface, they say

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man working on his boat fell into Lake Lanier, and now a search is underway, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources said.

The man was at Mary Alice Park on Dec. 16 when he went missing in the lake, according to spokesperson Mark McKinnon from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

The man who fell in was 46 years old, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported, but his identity has not yet been released.

“We believe he was attempting to work on his boat when he apparently entered the water and failed to resurface,” McKinnon told McClatchy News.

The search began the night of Dec. 16, but searchers suspended their efforts when it got dark and they could not continue.

The Department of Natural Resources’ Game Wardens were back on the scene at 7:30 a.m. on Dec. 17, including Forsyth Fire and the Corps of Engineers. The searchers are using sonar to scan the area, according to McKinnon.

Lake Lanier has more than 690 miles of shoreline. It holds over 624 billion gallons of water, enough to fill almost 950,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools, and it’s deepest point is 160 feet, based on data from the US Army Corps of Engineers.

It won Best Operated Lake of the Year in 1990, 1997 and 2002. But since then, it’s been no stranger to deaths and disappearances, either.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has documented a total of 325 boat accidents, 189 injuries and 55 drownings at the lake from 2010-2018. In 2014 alone, 10 people drowned in the lake, according to department statistics.

This year, the lake had seen six fatal accidents by mid-July, McClatchy News previously reported.

Alison Cutler is a National Real Time Reporter for the Southeast at McClatchy. She graduated from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and previously worked for The News Leader in Staunton, VA, a branch of USAToday.




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